Watch the film, Warrieor vs. Guardian mindsets in Policing from the link below.

Watch the film, Warrieor vs. Guardian mindsets in Policing from the link below.  Respond to the classmate discussion post below in a minimum of 100 words.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MgbfBnSPhqA 
In the last decade or so, the profile of the ideal police officer has undergone a transitory phase. Previously, preferred characteristics for a police officer were related to physical and emotional toughness. Police officers were expected to be stoic saviors who comprised the thin blue line that separated good people from bad people. Officers were viewed as sheepdogs who would protect the flock from wolves, but who would also keep the sheep in line for the good of the flock. Officers weren’t typically viewed as approachable; if you were talking to one, it was because something had gone horribly awry. A favorite saying of officer used to be “if I can’t fix your problem with something on my belt, you called the wrong number.”
Now we’re finding out what happens when the citizens who employ you discover that you refer to them as sheep. Society’s expectations for officers have changed. Or, rather, what society will tolerate from officers has changed. The ideal officer now carries traits more related to mortal humans. The ideal officer rates high on empathy and compassion scales, and is not quick to revert to the time honored “violence of action” method of ending dangerous situations quickly and efficiently. The ideal officer now relies on intelligence, both emotional and intellectual, more than muscle to get the job done. The ideal officer thinks problems through, and is eager to help find a solution, even if the solution is not strapped to their belt.

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